Holiday Pet Food Drive

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Dogs On The Farm runs an annual pet food drive to benefit local families, and we want to offer you the opportunity to join us in raising pet food donations this holiday season.  All season a sleigh will be displayed outside in our parking lot with donation bins.  Accepted donations include: canned and dry dog food, canned and dry cat food, treats, and cat litter.

Our goal is to provide support for local families to keep their pets in their loving homes rather than surrendering them to shelter due to lack of money for pet supplies.  All donations will be delivered to Lunch Break food pantry in Red Bank.  Lunch Break is a wonderful local food pantry/kitchen that provides food for families in need.  Although they are best known for their human food pantry, pet food is also in high demand and is well-used and appreciated by the local community.

When finances are stretched, especially around the holidays, families can be forced to choose between feeding themselves or their pets. In this situation even greatly loved pets are often surrendered to shelters.  Although it is wonderful to provide donations to pet shelters and rescues, we want to help families before they have to make the choice to give up their pets.

Donations are accepted year-round at the Dogs On The Farm office, but there is a sense of urgency around the holidays when pets are historically at greatest risk of being surrendered.

Dogs On The Farm runs an annual pet food drive to benefit local families, and we want to offer you the opportunity to join us in raising pet food donations this holiday season.  All season a sleigh will be displayed outside in our parking lot with donation bins.  Accepted donations include: canned and dry dog… Read more »

Winter Weather Safety

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You may be cursing the winter weather while you walk your dog on a mid-December evening, but most dogs love a good romp in the snow, and many hardly seem to notice the temperature has dropped.  Some even prefer it – Huskies and Malamutes live for this weather! – and with a few precautions your dog can enjoy the winter weather while keeping safe and healthy.

Your dog may love a long walk in the snow but do his feet?  Your dog’s pads need protection from the elements to prevent cracking and irritation.  The best protection is a set of winter booties that will keep their feet warm, dry, and safe from chemicals.  Of course, some dogs will not tolerate booties (watch this hilarious Youtube video). If booties aren’t an option, apply paw protectant like Vaseline or a wax based product like Musher’s Secret to your dog’s pads and between his pads prior to a walk or other outdoor playtime.  This won’t keep his feet from getting cold but will protect them from rough ice and snow and salt irritation.  After the walk make sure to rinse or wipe your dog’s feet to remove salt residue so he doesn’t lick it off.  On your own driveway make sure to use a pet safe ice melt, but be aware your neighbors and township likely will not.

It is also important to make sure your dog is staying warm enough. Keep in mind that if you’re cold your dog likely is too.  Small dogs like Yorkies and Malteses have trouble keeping warm and so do dogs without thick coats to protect them like Coonhounds and Weimareiners.  Dogs who are unsuited to cold weather will be happy to have a cozy sweater or jacket to wear in the winter.

Dogs with a thick coat or long hair should not be shaved during the winter, because their fur is important to insulate them through cold weather.  Trimming long hair to a reasonable length, though, can reduce the accumulation of snow balls that form in their coats and cause discomfort (and a wet living room).  Regular grooming appointments and daily brushings are still important for thick coated dogs because clumped matted hair can actually make them colder and can lead to skin injury and irritation.

It is important to make sure your dog is still getting regular exercise through the winter to keep him healthy and happy, so these cold weather health tips will allow you and your dog to get outside and get moving while staying comfortable and safe.

You may be cursing the winter weather while you walk your dog on a mid-December evening, but most dogs love a good romp in the snow, and many hardly seem to notice the temperature has dropped.  Some even prefer it – Huskies and Malamutes live for this weather! – and with a few precautions your dog can enjoy the winter… Read more »

Tips for a Safe Thanksgiving for Your Dogs

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Thanksgiving is right around the corner and dogs everywhere are drooling in anticipation of delicious table-side snacks from visiting guests.  Unfortunately some of those surreptitious snacks can lead to upset stomachs or emergency vet trips, but by following a few basic rules your dog can still enjoy the holiday meal safely.

Foods to avoid feeding your dog on Thanksgiving include raw turkey, cooked turkey bones, onions, herbs, chocolate, raw bread dough, or any excessively fatty food like turkey skin.  Also, watch food wrappings and garbages carefully as they are very tempting for dogs when the people are distracted.  For a full list of foods to avoid, check out this information from the ASPCA.  And don’t forget about your cat! Although more likely to hide from the hustle and bustle, cats can also get in trouble on Thanksgiving.

Some safe (and delicious) Thanksgiving foods your dog can enjoy guilt-free in limited amounts include cooked, boneless, white meat turkey, sweet potatoes, pumpkin, and vegetables like carrots or green beans. You can even prepare a Thanksgiving meal especially for your dog if you want him to really live it up!

Make sure that guests understand what your dog is allowed to eat. If you think your guests won’t be able to resist those puppy eyes, it may be safer to keep your dog in a secure back yard, a separate room, or his crate until the meal is cleaned up.

For more dog Thanksgiving tips, check out this website.

Thanksgiving is right around the corner and dogs everywhere are drooling in anticipation of delicious table-side snacks from visiting guests.  Unfortunately some of those surreptitious snacks can lead to upset stomachs or emergency vet trips, but by following a few basic rules your dog can still enjoy the holiday meal safely. Foods to avoid feeding… Read more »